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Old December 8th, 2011, 01:54 PM
BenMax BenMax is offline
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Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 10,187
Quote:
Originally Posted by violagirl View Post
I forgot this board is populated by paragons of virtue.

I didn't think I'd be the only person to feel this way.

However, today I walked different dogs and we were a bit more in tune.

Do you have any suggestions on how to get a dog that is not used to having human interaction to be more interested?
Sorry I did not put it more diplomatically perhaps. I would say I was being honest.
And yes, others feel the way you do. I don't understand it, not because I try to be 'all that' but because I truly don't understand a disconnect when an animal in dire straights, possibly misunderstood.

The best way to get an animal more inclinded to human contact would be to bond with him/her. If an animal is off standish, then I would not impose any training until a bond is established first. Baby steps.
If the dog loves toys, then play. If they respond to food, then feed. If they respond to nothing then just be patient and do not push yourself on the dog. He/she will come around.

We have had some dogs that respond to nothing. What we do (myself and DH) is just make things light. No training, just walking, sitting down in a nice quiet area, and just relax with them. Because we volunteer at a no kill, we have the luxury to take our time until trust is established.

I also network with a kill shelter where this methodology does not work due to time restraints. If that is the case, then a bond must be built quickly in order to get the dog to respond. It is a matter of life and death, and therefore you need to change your mindset and find whatever it is that will enable the dog to respond. Many times, it could be another dog (if dog friendly). If you pay attention to one, the other will follow. Again you need to focus in on what the dog responds to: treats, toys, play, brushing, massage...whatever you can figure out.

Rgeurts brings a very good point...seek advice with other volunteers or the behavioural department. They may provide some insight on the dog and give you the necessary background as well as other helpful hints.

Good luck.
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